Heritage Conservation District Study

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Heritage Conservation District directly speaks to the Community Strategic Plan's goal of: "Preserving our past, while forging our future."


The Amherstburg Historic Conservation District Study area reflects the historic commercial and residential core of the original Town.

Amherstburg has historically been defined by the Detroit River - its location upon that waterway - and very close proximity to Lake Erie. This maritime context led to the establishment of Fort Amherstburg, later Fort Malden, which gave rise to the Town. The fort dominated the town physically, economically, and culturally. The establishment of the fort in the late 1700s and the subsequent layout of the Town of Amherstburg in close proximity supported the community with its soldier population and the shipbuilding activity that occurred in the fort’s associated Navy Yard.






Amherstburg was the leading town in Essex County and Southwest Ontario, being a thriving commercial, trade, and population centre. The town was well connected with transportation links, with the two main roads in western Ontario emanating from the town. Ships provided direct service to Montreal and service to Detroit and other Great Lake cities. Additionally, the Town was a point on the Sauk trail, an ancient path system used by Indigenous peoples, and an important fur trading route. After the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850, immigration by fleeing slaves accelerated, with Amherstburg becoming an important destination and settlement area.

While Amherstburg gained railway service in 1872, Windsor overtook it in the early 1880s with improved rail service and the town began to lose its status as the principal town in Essex County. However, the town continued to be an important regional commercial centre and industrial town. The town was the headquarters of river dredging crews in the early 1900s as well as home to new industries like the Brunner Mond soda ash facility. The late 1800s and early 1900s also saw the town gain status as a summer resort with the development of Bois Blanc Island and resort hotels. The Town continued to evolve economically and physically as a result of all of these developments, albeit in a less significant way than in the nineteenth century.

Residents can participate in shaping this plan through participation.

1) ATTEND the Heritage Conservation District Study Open House & Information Session - Monday, April 15th, 5 pm-7 pm at the Libro Centre, 3295 Meloche Road

2) COMPLETE the survey, available until May 14th. The results of the Survey can be reviewed in the "Documents" section, or just click here.

3) ATTEND the Heritage Committee Meeting, to see the presentation of the HCD Study Report, on Thursday, June 6th, Starting at 5:30pm in Council Chambers. If you would like to be a delegate, please fill out the Delegation Form here.

4) ATTEND the Council Meeting, tentatively scheduled for June 24th, 2024.

EXPLORE Amherstburg's Designated Heritage Buildings, click here.

Those requiring accommodation can contact Town Hall at 519-736-0012.



Heritage Conservation District directly speaks to the Community Strategic Plan's goal of: "Preserving our past, while forging our future."


The Amherstburg Historic Conservation District Study area reflects the historic commercial and residential core of the original Town.

Amherstburg has historically been defined by the Detroit River - its location upon that waterway - and very close proximity to Lake Erie. This maritime context led to the establishment of Fort Amherstburg, later Fort Malden, which gave rise to the Town. The fort dominated the town physically, economically, and culturally. The establishment of the fort in the late 1700s and the subsequent layout of the Town of Amherstburg in close proximity supported the community with its soldier population and the shipbuilding activity that occurred in the fort’s associated Navy Yard.






Amherstburg was the leading town in Essex County and Southwest Ontario, being a thriving commercial, trade, and population centre. The town was well connected with transportation links, with the two main roads in western Ontario emanating from the town. Ships provided direct service to Montreal and service to Detroit and other Great Lake cities. Additionally, the Town was a point on the Sauk trail, an ancient path system used by Indigenous peoples, and an important fur trading route. After the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850, immigration by fleeing slaves accelerated, with Amherstburg becoming an important destination and settlement area.

While Amherstburg gained railway service in 1872, Windsor overtook it in the early 1880s with improved rail service and the town began to lose its status as the principal town in Essex County. However, the town continued to be an important regional commercial centre and industrial town. The town was the headquarters of river dredging crews in the early 1900s as well as home to new industries like the Brunner Mond soda ash facility. The late 1800s and early 1900s also saw the town gain status as a summer resort with the development of Bois Blanc Island and resort hotels. The Town continued to evolve economically and physically as a result of all of these developments, albeit in a less significant way than in the nineteenth century.

Residents can participate in shaping this plan through participation.

1) ATTEND the Heritage Conservation District Study Open House & Information Session - Monday, April 15th, 5 pm-7 pm at the Libro Centre, 3295 Meloche Road

2) COMPLETE the survey, available until May 14th. The results of the Survey can be reviewed in the "Documents" section, or just click here.

3) ATTEND the Heritage Committee Meeting, to see the presentation of the HCD Study Report, on Thursday, June 6th, Starting at 5:30pm in Council Chambers. If you would like to be a delegate, please fill out the Delegation Form here.

4) ATTEND the Council Meeting, tentatively scheduled for June 24th, 2024.

EXPLORE Amherstburg's Designated Heritage Buildings, click here.

Those requiring accommodation can contact Town Hall at 519-736-0012.



Share Heritage Conservation District Study Area Map on Facebook Share Heritage Conservation District Study Area Map on Twitter Share Heritage Conservation District Study Area Map on Linkedin Email Heritage Conservation District Study Area Map link

Heritage Conservation District Study Area Map

7 months

This map shows the Study Area outlined in red.  The points represent the properties that are on the Municipal Heritage Register, either as a Designated Property (red) or a Property of Interest (orange).

There are two study areas; the core of the Town of Amherstburg, and a stretch along Dalhousie Street.

Page last updated: 12 Jun 2024, 04:16 PM